Wednesday, October 13th, 2021
Fleming Ambulance responded to a residence on Justin Drive for a female experiencing heart problems and abdominal pains.
Fleming Ambulance responded to the VA Clinic on East Genesee Street in the City of Auburn for a car versus pedestrian MVA.
Fleming EMS responded to a residence on Hazlehurst Ave in Owasco for a male that has fainted but is conscious now.
Saturday, October 9th, 2021
Fleming Ambulance responded mutual aid to the intersection of Seminary and Arterial West in the City of Auburn for a 2 car MVA.
A delay in COVID-19 test results is being reported by the The Cayuga County Health Department.Both employees of the health department and contact tracers work 7 days a week, but without the results in...
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Winter is coming sooner than expected for the northeast. October has been spent with lots of sunshine and temperatures ‘above normal’ for a vast majority of the northeast. Next month that ...
Wednesday, October 13th, 2021
The air cools a little the rest of the week, but it remains very mild and not October like through the start of the weekend.WEDNESDAY:A weak cold front slides through with more clouds than not and a f...
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GRANBY, N.Y. — Multiple fire departments have responded to an early-morning house fire in Granby.Crews from around 10 different departments were dispatched to the scene, according to the Chief o...
COVID Vaccine

 

What You Can Start to Do

COVID-19_banner_when_fully_vaccinated_01

If you’ve been fully vaccinated:

  • You can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic.
  • You can resume activities without wearing a mask or staying 6 feet apart, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance.
  • If you travel in the United States, you do not need to get tested before or after travel or self-quarantine after travel.
  • You need to pay close attention to the situation at your international destination before traveling outside the United States.
    • You do NOT need to get tested before leaving the United States unless your destination requires it.
    • You still need to show a negative test result or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 beforeboarding an international flight to the United States.
    • You should still get tested 3-5 days after international travel.
    • You do NOT need to self-quarantine after arriving in the United States.
  • If you’ve been around someone who has COVID-19, you do not need to stay away from others or get tested unless you have symptoms.
    • However, if you live or work in a correctional or detention facility or a homeless shelter and are around someone who has COVID-19, you should still get tested, even if you don’t have symptoms.

What You Should Keep Doing

multiple images of people doing everyday things

For now, if you’ve been fully vaccinated:

  • You will still need to follow guidance at your workplace and local businesses.
  • If you travel, you should still take steps to protect yourself and others. You will still be required to wear a mask on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States, and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.  Fully vaccinated international travelers arriving in the United States are still required to get tested 3 days before travel by air into the United States (or show documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months) and should still get tested 3-5 days after their trip.
  • You should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19, especially if you’ve been around someone who is sick. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others.
  • People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system, should talk to their healthcare provider to discuss their activities. They may need to keep taking all precautions to prevent COVID-19.

 

Safety and Effectiveness

 

Is the vaccine safe and effective?

After a COVID-19 vaccine is authorized or approved for use by the FDA, many vaccine safety monitoring systems watch for adverse events (possible side effects). This ongoing monitoring can pick up on adverse events that may not have been seen in clinical trials. If an unexpected adverse event is seen, experts quickly study it further to see if it is a true safety concern. Experts then decide whether changes are needed in US vaccine recommendations.

In New York State, an added level of review was established to ensure COVID vaccine safety. Following FDA approval, experts on New York State's independent COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Advisory Task Force thoroughly review vaccine research before recommending any vaccine to New Yorkers. As of December 18, 2020, two COVID-19 vaccines have currently been approved by both the FDA and New York State's independent Clinical Advisory Task Force: the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the Moderna vaccine.

 

Will the vaccine give me COVID?

No. None of the vaccines being studied are made up of materials that can cause disease. For example, the first vaccine approved by the FDA uses a small, harmless part of the virus’s genetic material called ‘mRNA’. This is not the virus. mRNA vaccines teach your body to create virus proteins. Your immune system develops antibodies against these proteins that will help you fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if you are exposed to it. That is called an immune response.

 

Are COVID vaccines safe for children?  

Studies will need to be conducted testing COVID-19 vaccines in children. To date, no Phase 3 clinical studies of COVID-19 vaccines include children younger than 12 years. Please reach out to your health care provider with specific questions. Additional information can be found on www.cdc.gov or refer to these CDC guidelines for more information. 

 
Are COVID Vaccines safe for pregnant people or people thinking of becoming pregnant?

There is limited research about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnancy, but pregnant people may choose to get the COVID-19 vaccine if they are in a priority group for vaccination and do not have a medical reason not to be vaccinated. More studies are planned and vaccine manufacturers are monitoring people in the clinical trials who became pregnant. Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are not likely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant.  If you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, you should talk to your health care provider about your risk of getting COVID-19 and your risk of severe illness if you get sick.  Pregnant people with COVID-19 have an increased risk of severe illness. A vaccine may protect you from severe illness, which could help both you and your fetus.

 
If you get a vaccine do you need a negative COVID test beforehand? 

No. The CDC does not recommend COVID-19 screening tests before getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

 

Is it safe to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I have an underlying medical condition?

Yes. COVID-19 vaccination is especially important for people with underlying health problems like heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, and obesity. People with these conditions are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19. Please consult with your health care provider if you have specific questions about the COVID vaccine and your health.

 

If I already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated? 

Yes. CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19, because you can catch it more than once. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last.

 

Will the vaccine make me sick?

You may not notice any changes in how you feel after getting the shot. But it’s also possible to feel a little “under the weather.” This can happen after any vaccine. It is the body’s immune response to getting vaccinated and a sign that the vaccine is starting to work.

After the COVID-19 vaccine, you may have:

• A sore arm where you got the shot

• A headache

• Chills

• Fever

• Tiredness

Over the counter pain relievers and fever reducers may help.

You should feel better in a day or two. If you still don't feel well after two or three days, talk to your health care provider.

 
Will the vaccine work against new U.K. coronavirus strain? 

The State Department of Health’s Wadsworth Laboratory has confirmed cases of the United Kingdom (U.K.) coronavirus strain, also known as B.1.1.7, in New York State. While evidence indicates that the U.K. variant is more transmissible (contagious) than other variants, it is not believed to be more resistant to COVID-19 vaccines. 

 

Can I get an allergic reaction from the COVID-19 vaccine?

People can have allergic reactions to any medication or biological product such as a vaccine. Most allergic reactions occur shortly after a vaccine is administered, which is why the CDC recommends that persons with a history of anaphylaxis (due to any cause) are observed for 30 minutes after vaccination, while all other persons are observed for 15 minutes after vaccination. All vaccination sites must be equipped to ensure appropriate medical treatment is available in the event of an unlikely allergic reaction. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends anyone with an allergy to "any component" of the vaccine not get the vaccine.

 

Will there be side effects from the vaccine?

Common side effects that have been observed in clinical studies include fatigue, muscle soreness at the injection site and fever.

 

Is it better to get natural immunity to COVID-19 rather than immunity from a vaccine?

No. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection lasts. Vaccination is the best protection, and it is safe. People who get COVID-19 can have serious illnesses, and some have debilitating symptoms that persist for months.

 

How long will vaccine immunity last?

Researchers do not yet know how long immunity lasts after vaccination. That’s why continuing prevention practices like wearing a mask, washing your hands regularly and social distancing will still be important.

 

I’ve heard about “herd immunity.” What would it take to get the population to “herd immunity” for COVID-19?

‘Herd immunity’ happens when enough people have protection from a disease that it is unlikely that the disease will continue to spread. As a result, the virus won't easily spread among the community. Experts do not know what percentage of people would need to get vaccinated to achieve herd immunity to COVID-19. They also do not know how long the vaccine will protect people.

Letting COVID-19 spread through communities naturally would lead to unnecessary infections, suffering and death.

 
I tested positive for COVID antibodies. Do I still need the vaccine?

Yes. The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19, because you can be infected more than once. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last. Vaccination is the best protection, and it is safe. People who get COVID-19 may have serious illnesses, and some have debilitating symptoms that persist for months. 

 
If I get a COVID-19 vaccine, do I still need to wear a mask and social distance?

Yes. You will need to continue to wear a mask, practice social distancing and good hand hygiene for the foreseeable future as the vaccine gets rolled out in phases.

Experts need more time to understand the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on mask use. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

Availability

When should I get the vaccine? 

As soon as it's available to you. The State Department of Health will continue to share information on where and when New Yorkers can get vaccinated as more vaccine doses become available.

 

Who gets the vaccine first?

New York State will distribute the COVID-19 vaccine in phases based on need and risk. New Yorkers who are more likely to be exposed to the virus, and who are more likely to become seriously ill if they get COVID-19, will be offered the vaccine first. Both the federal government and New York State have developed plans to ensure that everyone will be able to get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available, at no cost no matter where they live.

The first New Yorkers to receive the vaccine as part of Phase 1 will be high-risk hospital workers (emergency room workers, ICU staff and Pulmonary Department staff), nursing home residents, nursing home staff, followed by all long-term and congregate care residents and staff, EMS workers, other health care workers, coroners and medical examiners.

 

Will there be more than one vaccine available?

Yes. Currently, two vaccines have been authorized by the FDA, and more vaccines are expected.

As of December 9, 2020, four vaccines began Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S.

Phase 3 trials are conducted with large numbers of people to study whether a vaccine is safe and how well it works.

 
How many times will I need to be vaccinated?

All but one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in Phase 3 clinical trials or those that have been approved for emergency use in the U.S. by the FDA need two shots to be effective. 

 

Is the vaccine free?

Yes. The COVID-19 vaccines will be available at no cost. 

 

Will I be required to get a vaccine?

New York State is not mandating the COVID-19 vaccine.

Eligibility and Scheduling

How do I know if I am eligible as an essential worker?

New Yorkers can check their eligibility through the Am I Eligible app. Eligible essential workers should contact their union or local health department for information.

Due to limited supply of the COVID vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule their vaccine shot.

 

Are walk-ins accepted or do I need to have an appointment?

You must have an appointment to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Walk-ins are not permitted. Vaccines are available at pharmacies, hospitals and through local health departments statewide – please contact your provider of choice to schedule your vaccine appointment.

New Yorkers can also make an appointment at a New York State operated vaccine site at ny.gov/vaccine or through the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline from 7am - 10pm, 7 days a week at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829).

Due to limited supply of the COVID vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule their vaccine shot.

 

Do I need to bring proof of eligibility when I go to my appointment? 

Yes. Individuals being vaccinated must bring proof of eligibility to the vaccination site. This may include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status. If you are eligible because of your age, bring a government-issued ID that includes your date of birth (like a Driver’s License or passport).

 

What age group is eligible to receive the vaccine?

As part of Phase 1b, New Yorkers age 65 or older are eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccines are available at pharmacies, hospitals and through local health departments statewide – please contact your provider of choice to schedule your vaccine appointment. New Yorkers can also check their eligibility through the Am I Eligible app and find a New York State operated vaccination site. New Yorkers who are not 65 or older may still be eligible if they are in one or more of the eligible categories.

Due to limited supply of the COVID vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule their vaccine shot.

 

I’m age 65 or older. How can I find out where to get the vaccine?

Vaccines are available at pharmacies, hospitals and through local health departments statewide – please contact your provider of choice to schedule your vaccine appointment. Additionally, there is a network of State-run sites distributing vaccine statewide – to determine eligibility and schedule appointments at New York State-run vaccination sites only, use the Am I Eligible app. You can also call the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline from 7am - 10pm, 7 days a week at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829). 

 

I’m a first responder. Am I eligible to get vaccinated?

The following first responder groups are eligible to get vaccinated as part of Phase 1b. Please review this list to see if you may be eligible.

  • Fire Service
    • State Fire Service, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
    • Local Fire Service, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
  • Police and Investigators
    • State Police, including Troopers
    • State Park Police, DEC Police, Forest Rangers
    • SUNY Police
    • Sheriffs' Offices
    • County Police Departments and Police Districts
    • City, Town, and Village Police Departments
    • Transit or other Public Authority Police Departments
    • State Field Investigators, including Department of Motor Vehicles, State Commission of Correction, Justice Center, Department of Financial Service, Inspector General, Department of Tax and Finance, Office of Children and Family Services, and State Liquor Authority
  • Public Safety Communications
    • Emergency Communication and Public Safety Answering Point Personnel, including dispatchers and technicians
  • Other Sworn and Civilian Personnel
    • Court Officers
    • Other Police or Peace Officers
  • Support of Civilian Staff of any of the above services, agencies or facilities
  • Corrections
    • State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Personnel, including correction and parole officers
    • Local Correctional Facilities, including correction officers
    • Local Probation Departments, including probation officers
    • State Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
    • Local Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities

 

First responders can either contact their union to schedule an appointment, contact their local health department, or find a New York State operated vaccination site by using New York State’s Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 

I am a Local Police Officer, Sheriff Deputy, State Trooper or support staff. How do I get a vaccine shot?

Police officers, State Troopers, Sheriffs’ Offices employees, and related support staff should contact their union or local health department for more information on scheduling an appointment. All New Yorkers, including these employees, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using New York State’s Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment.

 

I’m a member of the NYPD or FDNY. How do I get a vaccine shot?

New York City police officers & firefighters should contact their union to get more information on scheduling an appointment, or contact the New York City Department of Health. All eligible New Yorkers, including employees at NYPD and FDNY, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using the Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 

I’m a P-12 school faculty or staff member. How do I get a vaccine shot?

Teachers should contact their union or local health department to schedule an appointment, or find a New York State operated vaccination site by using New York State’s Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 

I’m a substitute teacher at a P-12 school or school district. Am I eligible to get the vaccine?

Yes. Substitute teachers at P-12 schools and school districts are included as part of Phase 1b and are eligible for vaccination.

 

I’m a school bus driver. Am I eligible to get the vaccine?

Yes. Contractors working in a P-12 school or school district, including contracted school bus drivers, are included as part of Phase 1b and are eligible for vaccination.

 
I’m a child care worker. Am I eligible to get the vaccine?

Yes, licensed or registered childcare providers are eligible for vaccination. Employees or support staff of licensed or registered childcare settings are also eligible. Vaccines are available at pharmacies, hospitals and through local health departments statewide – please contact your provider of choice to schedule your vaccine appointment. Additionally, there is a network of State-run sites distributing vaccine statewide – to determine eligibility and schedule appointments at New York State-run vaccination sites only, use the Am I Eligible app.  Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 

I’m a P-12 faculty or staff member in New York City. How do I get a vaccine shot?

Teachers should either contact their union for more information on scheduling an appointment, or contact the New York City Department of Health. All eligible New Yorkers, including New York City school faculty and staff members, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using the Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 

I’m a public transit worker (airline, passenger railroad, subway & mass transit, ferry, Port Authority employee, public bus employee). How can I get a vaccine shot?

Public transit employees should contact their union or their employer agency for more information on how to schedule a vaccine appointment. All eligible New Yorkers, including public transit workers, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using the Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment.

 

I am a Corrections Officer. How do I get a vaccine shot?

Correctional officers should contact their union or local department for more information on how to schedule a vaccination appointment. All eligible New Yorkers, including Corrections Officers, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using the Am I Eligible? App. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment.

Eligible Corrections officers and personnel include the following:

  • State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Personnel, including correction and parole officers
  • Local Correctional Facilities, including correction officers
  • Local Probation Departments, including probation officers
  • State Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
  • Local Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities

 

I work for a public bus company. How do I get a vaccine shot?

Individuals who work for a public bus company can contact their local union or their bus company who will be coordinating vaccination sites and scheduling appointments with their local health department. All eligible New Yorkers, including public bus drivers, can also find a New York State operated vaccination site by using the Am I Eligible app. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment.

 

I’m a public-facing grocery store worker. Am I eligible to get the vaccine?

Yes. Public-facing grocery store workers are eligible as part of Phase 1b. These employees should contact their union for more information how to get a vaccine, or find a New York State operated vaccination site by using New York State’s Am I Eligible app. If you schedule an appointment, you must bring proof of eligibility in the form of a pay stub and matching id. Please note that due to a limited supply of the vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule an appointment.

 
I want to schedule an appointment but I am being told there are no appointments available. What should I do?

Due to limited supply from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment. As supply increases, there will be more appointments available. We encourage New Yorkers to be patient as we wait for more vaccine supply.

 
On the forms I fill out prior to receiving the vaccine, will there be a non-binary gender option?

Forms generated and maintained by New York State and used at state and local health department vaccine administration sites will include a non-binary gender option.​

 
Should I wear a mask when I get vaccinated?

Yes. Please plan to bring and wear a mask or face covering when you go to get vaccinated.

 
The Am I Eligible pre-screening app says that I’m not eligible, but I believe that I am. What should I do?

The Am I Eligible app — New York State’s pre-screening tool — is not the final say whether or not someone will or will not receive the vaccine. If you believe you are in one of the eligible categories of New Yorkers, you can call the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline at 1- 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829), from 7am - 10pm, 7 days a week. After scheduling an appointment, all New Yorkers must complete the New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Form which includes a self-attestation under penalty of law that the individual is a member of a priority group eligible for vaccination.

 

Where can I find a full list of who is eligible for the vaccine?

Please visit this page to see the current list of who is eligible for COVID-19 vaccination.

 

 


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